Write From Home

Home  Busy Freelancer  Bookstore 

2003, 2004, 2005 & 2006: Named one of the 101 best Web sites for writers by Writers Digest Magazine.

Selected by Bella Life Books as one of the top ten lists for writers in the "10 Top 10 Lists for Writers."



Boost Your Income by Writing for Trade Magazines!

(
This site best viewed using Internet Explorer at 1024 x 768 resolution.)

 

 



About Write From Home

Contributing Writers & Columnists

Reprint Policy

Privacy Policy

Write From Home
Kim Wilson
P.O. Box 4145
Hamilton, NJ 08610

E-mail: kim @ writefromhome.com

Write4Kids.com

Your Odds of Getting Published
by Laura Backes, Write4Kids.com—The Children's Writing SuperSite

Most beginning writers are curious about their chances of ever seeing their work in print. Editors have told me that a mid-to large-sized publishing house gets upwards of 5000 unsolicited submissions a year. About 95% are rejected right off the bat (most get form letters, a few promising authors get personalized notes stating why the manuscript was rejected). Of the 5% left, some are queries for which the editors request entire manuscripts. Others are manuscripts submitted in their entirety, and these go on to the next stage of the acquisitions process (get passed around the editorial department, presented at editorial meetings, perhaps looked at by sales staff to get a sense of the market for the book). The end result is that 1-2% of unsolicited submissions are actually purchased for publication.

But, you ask, if so few manuscripts are bought from the slush pile, why are so many new books published each year? The unsolicited "slush" comes from authors the editors have never worked with before: new writers and those who don't have agents. Experienced writers and those who have already published with that house make up the rest of the list.

Before you trash your computer and take up knitting, let's put this all in perspective. Most manuscripts are rejected because they're just plain bad. The stories are trite, the characters wooden, the endings predictable. The plots may smack of didacticism or patronize the young reader. Authors who don't understand the basic rules of grammar or who can't send a properly formatted manuscript won't get a close look. Those who submit their work to every publisher listed in Children's Writer's & Illustrator's Market instead of taking the time to target publishers appropriate for their work add substantially to the glut of publishers' mail (and the eventual banning of unsolicited submissions by some houses).

If you take the time to learn how to write a strong story with multifaceted characters, your manuscript will rise to the top. If you study the age group for which you want to write, and keep the length and content appropriate for your audience, your work will stand out. If you watch the current market and find a niche you can fill, an editor is more likely to give you careful consideration.

One more point: General fiction is the most competitive genre in any age group of children's books. It's also the most subjective, meaning your manuscript has to appeal to exactly the right editor. If you have any interest in nonfiction and can approach a topic in a unique, entertaining way, you'll be a bigger fish in a much smaller pond. Or, try narrowing your niche so your work stands out from the ocean of fiction: write historical fiction for beginning readers, funny mysteries for middle grades, science fiction for young adults. Stretching your writing beyond general fiction will give you a "hook" and also help you zero in on publishers who want exactly what you've got.


About the Author:

Laura Backes is the publisher of Children's Book Insider, the Newsletter for Children's Writers, and co-founder of the Children's Authors Bootcamp seminars. For more information about writing children's books, including free articles, market tips, insider secrets and much more, visit Children's Book Insider's home on the Web at http://write4kids.com

Copyright 2003, Children's Book Insider, LLC
 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

Free Mini E-Course Download PDF
Writing For Profit: Break Into Magazines
by Cheryl Wright


 

 


Article Library

Off the Page

Life of a Writer Mom

Dabbling for Dollars

Interviews with Authors & Writers

Copywriting, Marketing, PR & General Business

The Writing Trade

 

 

 

 

Writing For Children

Writing With Children

Taxes & Freelancers              
           
Great Magazines For Writers

magazine cover



 

Subscribe to
Writer's Digest magazine!
 

magazine cover
Subscribe to The Writer magazine  


New to freelance writing?

Read this informative article.

Read Glossary of Writing Terms

Authors Area

Agents & Publishers

Book Marketing

Publications

(Electronic & Print)

 

Resources

Associations & Organizations

Job Boards & Guideline Databases

Research & Reference
 

Links

Author &

Writer Web Sites

Writing Sites



Copyright © 2001-2013 Kim Wilson/Kim Wilson Creative Services.